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ArtBeat 2015 Literature and Poetry Events

Short Story Competition entrants at ArtBeat 2015This year we have a combination of writing workshops, poetry performances, people talking about writing and a quiz. Plus a competition!

Short Story Writing Competition

The competition is now closed and the winners will be announced on Sunday 21st June, 11am at Fingerprints Cafe. Huge thanks to the following sponsors for donating prizes:

  • Toni Fazaeli  – for the short story awards – 14 and over
  • Alan Tuckett – for the short story awards – under 14
  • Luithlen Agency (Penny Kitchener) – short story awards under 14
  • Marc Thorley – LOROS  Bookshop – Pub Book Quiz prizes

Family Events

We have events for all ages. For younger children there will be a workshop on how to make up a fairy story led by local writer Polly Tuckett and an after school storytelling session with Ruth Fraser.

There will be two workshops for teenagers. One on drama led by the lively OnCue Arts; and the other for those who want to blog about music led by Michelle Dhillon, founder of Rockhaq.com.

Poetry on Toast at ArtBeat 2015Poetry

Poet and performer Liz Gray leads on reading and performing poetry, whether it is your own work or that of somebody else. If they want to, people will then be able to practise their skills at the Poetry on Toast open mic session the following morning.

Memoir Writing

Many people are interested in writing a memoir. This may be because they think their life might be of interest to others or because they simply want to make sense of it themselves. Mary Essinger will be running a workshop to encourage people to delve into their memory banks and start writing.

Readings

There are two With Great Pleasure events, one at South Lodge, and the other at Vernon House. People are encouraged to bring something to read that they particularly enjoy, share it with others and say why they particularly like it.

Writing

On Monday evening local writers Mashuda Snaith, Liz Gray and Stuart Hill will be talking about their work and the process of writing.  Readers are often aspiring writers and may be curious to know how to get the creative juices flowing. Where do you begin with a story? Is it the plot, the place or the characters; or a combination of all three? Or is there something else that acts as a wellspring to people’s ideas? Questions, questions. Why not come along to ask some more and get the answers?

Quiz Time!

Finally, for those of you who like quizzes, we will be running our first pub book quiz on Tuesday evening. If you fancy yourself as a bit of a whizz at the quiz or want to form a team with your friends and join in the fun, why not come along?  There will be prizes!


For further information about all these events check out the Festival Programme. There you will see a day-by-day calendar with dates, times, venues and, where appropriate, booking arrangements.

ArtBeat 2014 – Day 11

What a turnout for Sarah Kirby’s talk at College Hall on Sunday morning. More seats had to be called for as 50 people waited eagerly to hear one of Leicester’s finest print artists talk about the work she had been commissioned to produce as part of her residency with the University of Leicester’s Department of Urban History. Illustrating her talk by referring to the linocuts of industrial buildings on the wall that formed her exhibition, Sarah told us why the city’s industrial legacy is so important. Two aspects of her talk were particularly interesting. First, her perspective that buildings are not just about their look but about the people who use them, work in them or live in them; they are compelling creations for social as well as architectural reasons. Second, that each building needs to be seen and considered in relation to what is around it; that it is part of a larger landscape and these other features belong in her representations.

Sarah also told us about the process she goes through in both designing her linocuts and in actually making them, fascinating insights into the work of a most gifted artist. We are lucky that Sarah has taken Leicester so much to her heart.

Then off to the Queens Road Summer Fair where throngs gathered to look at and buy the merchandise on sale; and listen to some good quality music. A great vibe as ever and the three ward councillors, whose creation this is, expressed themselves very happy with the turn-out.

In the afternoon at Christchurch there was a treat for music lovers. The Tudor Choir and Knighton Chamber Ensemble played and sang Vivaldi amongst a selection of classical pieces. The hall was full and the audience very appreciative; and the musicians too. One of them said the audience was bigger than they sometimes get for their concerts. Clearly Clarendon Parkers are music lovers of many styles, tastes and genres, judging by the good attendances at so many events throughout the festival.

Then finally down to The Donkey in the evening for the disco that marked the close-down of this the first community arts festival in Clarendon Park. Derek Bland showed himself to be a master disc spinner as he rolled back the years to the rock and soul of yesteryear much to the delight of his largely sexagenarian audience. There was to be no stilling of this ArtBeat. The clock was fast approaching midnight as we straggled out into the quiet streets.

Shhh…..don’t you realise some people have to go to work tomorrow morning?!

ArtBeat 2014 – Day 10

In the morning at Avenue Primary School Bollywood and Classical Indian Dance attracted people of all ages – from 3 years to 73 years. We swayed our way through some great Bollywood numbers and then settled down to watch an inspiring performance by Nimisha Parmar. She used classical steps and hand movements to illustrate a sung version of the Isle of Innisfree by W B Yeats. One happy customer described the event as wonderfully relaxed, a true East Meets West experience.

Nearly 70 people, including half a dozen children, enjoyed another lunchtime concert at Christchurch today, many, no doubt, drawn by the buzz created by Mariko Terashi’s performance on Monday. This time she played works by Scarlatti, Seixas, and Chopin as well as a dramatic piece about a female Spanish bullfighter! Dazzling technique and powerful contrasting expression.

Sharing the bill was The Clarendon Trio – violin, viola and cello – for whom this was only their second concert performance. Ann, Judith and Hazel were joined by Hazel’s sister, Rachel, on oboe to play Mozart’s Oboe Quartet with great panache.

The audience enjoyed the concert greatly “ Fantastic venue, great music’” “’Excellent music – what a treat!”

It looks as if these lunchtime concerts have stimulated an appetite for more!

A Musical Garden Party was held at at 39 Craighill Road. The Stapleton family were hosts and were thankful there was only light drizzle at one stage and the quality of the musicians they had assembled enabled all to make light of the weather. The garden setting was a delight with musicians on the patio and many children running among the audience – including one toddler intent on playing a duet with Andrea on his Egyptian drum!

Over 100 people passed through during the course of the afternoon enjoying the music and the excellent supply of crepes and Tiny Bakery scones. Even the hens enjoyed the event, producing at least one egg as a result of’ the music. Many thanks, Ian and Jo, for creating such a great event.

ArtBeat 2014 – Day 9

All the arts were in evidence today: printing, dancing, literature and music. At College Court Sarah Kirby, one of Leicester’s foremost print artists, was exhibiting examples of the linocuts she has produced as part of the project she has been doing for the Department of Urban History at Leicester University. The idea is to represent in this print form some of the city’s beautiful industrial buildings such as the Corona machine tool factory. The exhibition is on for two more days until the end of the festival and Sarah will be talking about this project on Sunday morning at 11.30 – in College Court, Knighton Road.

There was a short performance of Indian classical dance for the elderly residents of South Lodge to enjoy in the afternoon. They were then invited to dance themselves along to the music that would have got them on the dance floor in their younger days. Some of those taking part had also enjoyed the tea dance earlier in the week.

In the evening at Avenue Primary School three of Leicester’s successful authors of fiction gave their audience a fascinating insight into the lives of writers. Janet Adams, Rod Duncan and Bali Rai talked about what and who got them writing in the first place, why they choose the particular genres (crime fiction and stories for young adults). There were some common threads running through much of what they said. They start with a sense of place, then find the characters and develop them, and then comes the plot. They tend not to know the end of the story when they start writing. They also said that 1000 words of new writing constituted a good day’s work.

Back to the Cradock late in the evening to catch the Andy Wales gig. Tremendous driving blues, drawing on the work of Robert Cray and B B king as well some of their own original stuff. There was an appreciative crowd who earlier had found the music from other bands engaging enough to distract them from watching on TV the Dutch destruction of the World Cup holders Spain in Brazil. The music at all the venues this last week has been varied and of high quality, reminding us of how much talent there is on our own doorstep and how accessible it can be.

ArtBeat 2014 – Day 8

The Botanic Gardens provided a splendid space for 25 children and adults to make their own sculpture out of clay. On a warm, sunny afternoon in the garden among the sculptures, installed but not yet curated, children became intensely involved in creating different shapes – towers, tree trunks and some quite abstract. People really seemed to get a buzz out of doing something creative in the outdoors “It was so good to be making something, not just looking” said one. A refreshing combination of sunshine, clay, garden………..and creativity!

There was more story-telling at the Knighton Library from city librarian Paul Gobey, this time for children over 8. The stories and refreshments were appreciated by the children and one parent said he thought this was a great way to get children into a public library.

In the evening Fingerprints in Queens Road was full for Memory Wire – atmospheric electronic music by Chris Conway and Jim Tetlow. Chris has been showcasing his talent with different instruments in different venues as part of ArtBeat this week, celebrating 25 years as a professional musician. There were some lovely floaty numbers that complemented  the warm summer evening brilliantly and the whole atmosphere was beautifully relaxed.

Meanwhile down at the Cradock there was some great gigging going on to a good-sized appreciative audience. The N’Ukes played covers of well-known classics from The Beatles, Rolling Stones, et al; The Bellatones played some of their original songs and were warmly received; The BrandyThieves, played a blend of gipsy, ska and punk with great gusto. It was fantastic to see bands with strong women performers playing and singing.

ArtBeat 2014 – Day 7

Events and activities did not start until this evening but then three different events, each in their different way, turned out to be stimulating and successful.

In a house in Howard Road, 25 people (children and adults) gathered to hear 11 year-old Anna, accompanied by her teacher, play pieces of Bach on the violin. She was joined by Alec on cello and Jonathan on piano. These were examples of music that Anna has learned to play through the Suzuki method and provided a delightful half an hour for listeners on a sunny evening. With the doors and windows open, it was lovely to hear the strains of the great composer wafting through the Clarendon Park air. Well done Anna and thank you!

Bryan Merton & Robert Colls. Meanwhile there was another gathering at St John’s Parish Hall opposite the school at the east end of Clarendon Park Road. Here between 40 and 50 people came to take part in an extended conversation with Rob Colls, Professor of Cultural History at De Montfort University, about his recently published and much acclaimed book George Orwell: English Rebel. It was a fascinating exploration of the many contradictions of this great writer best known for his novel 1984 and political allegory Animal Farm. Yet it became clear that some of his essays written about culture and politics in the 1940s probably represented his best work and have had a great impact on what has now become known as cultural studies. Rob’s detailed and intricate knowledge of Orwell’s life and work captured the attention of all those attending and proved to be a masterly display of public education. What an informative and hugely enjoyable evening.

Then down to The Cradock for an evening of top quality jazz. There were four bands culminating with the Happy Landings. Keyboard player Chris Conway, who seems to be a brilliant exponent of each of the many instruments he plays, said “who’d have thought I could have an audience like this just within walking distance from my house and not need to carry my instruments there”. It was a busy evening in the pub but the place never seems crowded with its many bars and people sitting out in the garden in the warm summer night. But there was a throng round the jazz players and no wonder – the calibre of the playing was very high.