Short Story Competition entrants at ArtBeat 2015

Short Story Writing Talent

This year for the first time ArtBeat has organised a short story writing competition, one for adults and one for children and young people. We were not sure how this would go down, with regard to both the amount of interest and take-up and to the quality of the entries. Entrants were asked to write a short story that said something about their neighbourhood.

Not surprisingly for a first-ever competition, there was not a great number of entries but those that were entered were of a very high standard – in both categories. This is very encouraging. Not only does it reinforce the view that Clarendon Park has talent. But it means that we will have a reservoir of talent for the future – as long as these young writers choose to stay in the area.

Penny Luithlen, is a literary agent and she was one of the three judges that helped to choose the winners. She told me that the standard of writing was very high. The initial reading of scripts is very telling and she says that immediately it became clear that it was going to be hard to discount any at all. The stories felt local and there were some interesting ways in which entrants chose to interpret the brief.

The three judges (the other two are writers) found there was much for them to agree about, in particular what they liked. The children’s stories were wide-ranging and it made them think that perhaps next time there should be a category for even younger writers to differentiate them from the older children and not disadvantage them.

The judges considered who best answered the brief, who had the best variety of ‘telling’ techniques, and who told a story that surprised and delighted them and took them on a special journey. Ultimately it all comes down to personal taste. There was plenty to both agree and disagree about. In the adult category, there was a split decision in selecting the winner. In the children’s category the dilemma was that there were not enough prizes because so many of the entrants were potential winners.

Penny is adamant that those who entered must carry on writing, regardless of whether or not they are prize-winners this year. The responsibility of selecting a winner has weighed heavily on the judges but they have enjoyed the experience. They commend all those who entered for having the courage to do so. It is brave to show your work to someone else to judge. So all those who took part have taken a huge step and are commended for their talent and their bravery.

So if you want to know who won and what they wrote about, the winners are to be announced in the middle of the festival at 11 am on Sunday 21 June at Fingerprints on Queens Road. You will be able to meet those who entered and hear a little of what has been written. I can’t wait!